The Amazing Story of FabMo: How Two Dedicated People Can Make a Big Difference

The Amazing Story of FabMo: How Two Dedicated People Can Make a Big Difference
Posted on October 13, 2017 by ANYTexture  https://www.anytexture.com/2017/10/the-amazing-story-of-fabmo-how-two-dedicated-people-can-help-the-world/
Exactly two years ago I came home with a small stash of beautiful upholstery fabric samples. Little did I know how quickly and profoundly these textiles would change my life! Today I want to tell the amazing story of FabMo, the non-profit organization where I acquired those samples, and the inspiring story of it’s two co-founders, Hannah and Jonathan Cranch.

Hannah and Jonathan Cranch

How It All Started

A couple of decades ago Hannah and Jonathan Cranch were ordinary people going about their own business. Hannah taught art in Palo Alto primary schools, while Jonathan was a general contractor. They occasionally enjoyed attending seasonal open houses at the Design Center in San Francisco, seeing what was new in the design world. They both enjoyed the refreshments, browsing the beautiful displays and chatting with the salespeople

One day, during one such visit, they saw a man toss a big trash bag into the dumpster. The bag tore open, spilling out a bunch of gorgeous fabrics. It turned out that in preparation for the open houses, the showrooms had to make room for newly released fabrics, which meant getting rid of all the discontinued textiles. These exquisite, expensive designer fabrics, which were displayed but never used, were thus headed for the landfill.

Hannah, as an art teacher, knew her fellow teachers would salivate over such a treasure, so she began the quest to save these resources. She visited showrooms and spoke with key people, asking for some fabrics, and they gradually agreed to give her some. Each time, she returned home with a bag or two full of lustrous samples, which she distributed to Palo Alto teachers.

As she gradually built relationships, the amount of material she acquired began to grow. Soon, she and Jonathan started supplying five school districts, and passed some fabrics on to the Children’s Theater, as well.

When Things Got More Serious

Hannah later learned that someone named Steve was visiting the showrooms every Monday to collect discontinued fabric samples, which were then picked up by a charitable organization run by a group of nuns. One day the charity did not come by to pick up, and so showroom workers asked Hannah, who was fortuitously at the Design Center at that moment, whether she wanted the fabrics. She certainly did! As it turned out, the charity never came back, and Hannah began a weekly pickup from then on. With the sudden increase in quantity, the picture changed dramatically.

Selection at Johnathan and Hannah’s house

At essentially the same time, in summer 2007, Palo Alto schools closed for the summer. Hannah and Jonathan were unable to distribute the growing amounts of fabrics they were collecting. They published notices on Freecycle, Craigslist and other online venues, and began compiling an email list of interested people. Soon after, they set up five tables in their living room, filled them up with materials, and invited these interested fabric-lovers to come over and pick whatever they wanted. Before long this became a recurring event.

Originally, Hannah and Jonathan distributed the materials they gathered. They were the ones deciding what resources to give each school/theater. Once they allowed people to come over to their house and pick on their own, however, they could no longer think of it as “distribution.” They decided to call these “selection events” instead, since patrons got to choose their own treasures.

At first, their living-room events lasted two days. As the amount of fabrics kept growing, they were extended to three. Soon, the living room wasn’t big enough for everything. Hannah and Jonathan set up yet more tables in their family room.

But the rescued samples kept accumulating. In no time they filled one spare bedroom, then another, until all the bedrooms in the house were full of textiles and other materials.

Hannah and Jonathan began holding regular selection events, timing them to open up a guest room as needed.

Their email list, initially limited to about thirty people, kept growing. Before long, some one hundred and seventy people came by every month. Some were hesitant to enter a private house. Others, however, came regularly. Some of the latter offered to help pay for the gas for Hannah’s collection trips to SF, so Hannah and Jonathan put up a donation box to help finance their drives. Then someone offered to help take care of welcoming guests. One day, when Hannah, who was also co-owner of a catering business, was too busy with an event, Jonathan took that woman up on her offer. From then on the Cranches relied more and more on volunteers to help them with the many tasks of gathering, sorting and distributing. They started documenting who came to their house, and, in order to limit crowding, began setting appointments.

How FabMo Was Born

In 2009, after years of making fabrics available from their private house, Jonathan learned that their home insurance would not cover such large gatherings. Although the Cranches distributed everything for free, the insurance considered what they were doing as a business. So they found a small shared space in Palo Alto where they could hold Selection Events, but which had very little room for storage.

Six months later they moved to a bigger warehouse on Old Middlefield Road. Later they added another warehouse.

That same year FabMo was born as a public benefit corporation, and in 2010 was granted 501(c)(3) status. FabMo was now officially a non-profit organization! The name FabMo is short for Fabrics and More, as by then the Cranches rescued many different materials. In addition to fabrics, they also saved wallpapers, trims, tiles, leather, carpets and so on.

Since then, FabMo’s activities have continued to expand. Nine years ago, a regular attendee suggested creating an event for people to showcase items they created with FabMo materials, so as to inspire others. That’s how the Holiday Boutique came about. In 2015 FabMo moved into their current location in Mountain View. They regularly hold monthly three-day Selection Events, as well as 8-10 Special Sales a year.

In 2014 FabMo started holding regular events in Santa Cruz as well, with an active volunteer and consumer base there. They also hold Selection Events in Vallejo, as well as in different Bay Area Tech Shops. FabMo has a regular presence in at least four fairs every year (MakersFaire, San Mateo County Fair, and two Earth Day Fairs).

FabMo Now

These days, FabMo rescues more than 70 tons of materials every year from Design Centers in San Francisco and San Jose, and from other miscellaneous sources. They make these amazing resources available to creative souls all over the Bay Area and beyond. More than 8,500 people are signed up to their mailing list, with about 300 coming to collect treasures during each Selection Event. Hannah and Jonathan continue to be very involved with the organization relying on an active Board, a growing family of several hundred volunteers, and textile aficionados, who, like themselves, appreciate the creative and environmental impact of this amazing endeavor. People come from Hawaii, the Pacific Northwest, Michigan and beyond to attend, determining their own schedule based on FabMo’s.

To this day, FabMo distributes fabrics for a suggested donation. It trusts patrons to give what they can to help keep the project running. Costs of maintaining such a business in the Bay Area are sky-high, as are utilities and fuel. Teachers still receive many of the materials for free. FabMo only sells Special Sale materials, but even then for low prices.

Hannah and Jonathan didn’t plan any of this. They simply couldn’t stand to see fabulous textiles thrown away and wasted, and before they knew it, FabMo had appeared. What started as a small project of love run by two individuals, turned into a collaborative effort of a creative, eco-friendly community, a family of sorts. But it still remains a not-for-profit project of love.

FabMo’s dedication continues to keep tons of precious resources out of the landfill. It also progressively builds an entire community of like-minded people who care about the environment. Likewise, it encourages the creativity of numerous others. The Cranches certainly changed my life, re-sparking my own long-suppressed creativity.

Now, people from all over the United States are starting to ask how to establish similar organizations. The Cranches even received a few inquiries from overseas. Imagine how many resources could be rescued if every community had a FabMo! Imagine all the creative things people could come up with!

To learn more about FabMo or sign up to their mailing list check out their web page: http://www.fabmo.org/fabmo/Home.htlmYou can also like their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/FabMo.

Innovative textile artist,Scott Bodenner

IT IS SOMEWHAT UNUSUAL TO HAVE A loom in the dining room, even among professional weavers. But that is what you’ll find when visiting Scott Bodenner in his apartment, located just across from the Brooklyn Museum. Constantly in use, either by Bodenner himself or his assistant, Rachel Bordeleau, the loom is a dobby-type with twenty-four harnesses. It is not ideal for producing large quantities, but that’s not what it’s for. It is a prototyping machine. On this loom, Bodenner tries out new ideas, experiments constantly, and, finally, creates samples that are sent to prospective clients and ultimately to textile mills. From his dining room unspool hundreds of yards of cloth to locations far-flung, and sometimes unknown.

Bodenner’s craft-based approach makes him an unusual figure in contemporary textile design, which is now al most entirely conducted at computer screens. It’s not that the digital revolution has left him behind—he is plenty adept with the relevant software—but rather that he prefers to work with materials directly. This sensibility places him in a lineage of American studio weavers going back to the mid-century era, names like Dorothy Liebes and Jack Lenor Larsen. Like those influential figures, he is constantly on the lookout for the advantages of hand-craftsmanship. Among these is the fact that he can use materials that are far outside the ordinary. Liebes pioneered the use of metallic synthetics like Lurex; Bodenner, too, incorporates unconventional yarns in his work, to still more unconventional effect.

A great example is a fabric called Moon Light. Bodenner has loved things that glow in the dark since childhood, and this cloth does just that. By day, it is beautiful and delicate. By night it makes you feel as if you are in a particularly luxurious cabin on the USS Enterprise. Because the warp of a fabric must be held in tension on the loom, Bodenner often uses a standard yarn in that direction, adding his eccentric touches in the weft. Moon Light is composed of a fine Italian linen warp, with a weft yarn made of intertwined linen and thinly slit, luminescent polyester film. The polyester is treated with strontium aluminate, so that it absorbs light and then emits it in the dark.

An even more unusual fabric in the new collection is Mix Tape, which is what it sounds like it might be: a cloth made partly from recycled audiotape. Like everyone who grew up in the 1980s, Bodenner has owned plenty of personalized cassettes—each one a precious record of a moment in time, perhaps the vestige of a friendship or romance. Now that technology has rendered these little time capsules obsolescent, he would put them to a different use, and many of his acquaintances have duly presented him with boxes of old mixtapes for him to weave. He also offers clients the opportunity to have a fabric custom-made “to memorialize a special recording,” a good example of the opportunities afforded by Bodenner’s hand-craftsmanship.

 

 

From Modern Magazine, edited for space

http://modernmag.com/brooklyns-rumpelstiltskin-the-innovative-textile-artist-scott-bodenner/3/

Eli Leon, collector of quilts and other items

Eli Leon — A lifetime of quirky collections for sale

Eli Leon and Lemmy. Photo courtesy of Eli Leo Living Trust
Eli Leon and Lemmy. Photo: Courtesy of Eli Leo Living Trust

For 55 years, Oakland Reichian psychotherapist Eli Leon collected kitchiana, textiles, aprons, vintage clothing, traditional standard quilts, and, most famously, Afro-tradition quilts which he bought in California and on repeated research and collecting trips to East Texas, northern Louisiana, and southern Arkansas.

Beginning on June 23 through 25, Geneva and Julie Addison will be selling his collections, other than the Afro-tradition quilts, in his home at 5663 Dover St. in Oakland, a few blocks south of Berkeley. The collections are breathtaking — manifestations of a driven collector with a sharp eye for acquisition and for juxtaposition in his home. Proceeds from the sale will go towards Leon’s care. See their blog about the sale, with more than 500 photographs.

At my Quirky Berkeley blog, I explored Leon’s life, home and collections. Here I present a small portion of the wonderful quirk that will be for sale this weekend. The first weekend of the sale will deal with the non-textile collections. The traditional quilts and other textiles will be sold later this summer. The sale is first come, first served. It represents a perfect chance to pick up some pre-collected quirky material culture and to honor a great scholar and collector.

Describing Leon’s collection is not simple.

A homemade vest, using a grits sack for the fabric.

Leon’s most famous collection is of African-American quilts; it is the hope of his Trust that the collection be preserved intact by a museum or consortium of museums, so none will be for sale. About 100 of the traditional American quilts, but here are a couple photos that give a sense:

Double Wedding ring-yellow

Double wedding ring quilt. Photo: Chere Mah
Quirky Berkeley in Berkeley, Calif., on June 15th, 2017.

Quirky Berkeley in Berkeley, Calif., on June 15th, 2017.

Leon kept most of his quilts in temperature and humidity-controlled airtight vaults.

Leon was a passionate and driven and skilled collector. I have never seen a better opportunity for buying quirky little things, and visiting Leon’s house will give a glimpse into the world of that driven and talented collector.

 

Tom Dalzell, a labor lawyer, created a website, Quirky Berkeley, to share all the whimsical objects he has captured with his iPhone. The site now has more than 8,000 photographs of quirky objects around town as well as posts where the 30-year resident muses on what it all means.

Studio Art Quilt Associates: Featured Artist: Maria Shell

Maria Shell is an inspiration  to artists around the world.

SAQA Featured Artist: Maria Shell

Maria Shell

Maria Shell  Anchorage, Alaska http://www.saqa.com/weblog/?p=2971

Artist Statement

Since 2011, I have been working in a series called Colors Grids. This has been a very satisfying explo-ration of patchwork as art. I love to layer pattern on top of pattern. Essentially, I am piecing, with my sewing machine, my own prints. These quilts are modern day tapestries of color, pattern, repetition, and stitch.

According to Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns, my Color Grid quilts are inspired by and related to the following quilt blocks–The Red Cross Quilt, Stone Mason’s Puzzle, City Streets, Squares and Square, and my favorite, Crossed Square.

Limiting the structure of my work to the traditional quilt block has allowed me to go deep into color and print. How do I get color to vibrate? How do I get a self made print to read against another self made print? How can I stitch these elements together so that the viewer sees not only hundreds of scraps of fabric but also the SUM–the whole as greater than its parts? What would happen if a traditional bed quilt ate a healthy dose of psychedelic mushrooms? Those are the questions I am trying to answer.

Vintage and contemporary commercial solid and print cotton fabrics, as well as hand dyed cotton textiles I have created are the materials I use in my work. These textiles are improvisationally and ruler cut and then stitched into a two dimensional surface. Once I create this pieced canvas, I spend hours on my long arm quilting machine stitching the top to cotton or wool batting and a fabric backing. The final step is to bind or face each individual piece.

TRIBE © Maria Shell

Beyond my love of the process of making a quilt—the hours of stitching, designing, ironing, and cutting—I am also a fierce advocate of the quilt as a legitimate art form. Many art quilters shy away from the word quilt and work actively to bury any references to the tradition in their work. They use the materials and techniques of the quilt while publicly denying its ancestry, preferring instead to align themselves with mediums more easily recognized as fine art—painting and photography, in particular.For years I have stood alone on this issue. My friends would say, don’t call yourself a quilter—there is so much baggage there! And I would say that is the point, but it is not baggage—it is a tradition and a history, and I stand on the backs of those who went before me with the hopes of moving this craft into new territory that celebrates the past while simultaneously embracing the future.

What makes me happiest is to create the most wacky colorful beautiful quilted compositions I can and then share them with the world.

Interview

SAQA: When did you begin making art with fabric? Do you work in other media as well?

SHELL: I started stitching when I was four years old. My mother let me use old clothing, and I made all kinds of things in the way that children do—stuffed animals and dolls, handbags, and pillows. I did not have sewing patterns or fancy fabric. So, I went at creating with what I had. My mother promised me a sewing machine when I turned ten, and I held her to it.

I think of myself as a maker whose primary medium is cloth and stitch. There is something about working with these materials that makes me feel good about myself and the world.

Dance Party at Tamara’s House © Maria Shell

I am obsessed with daily art projects. Last year for Project Every Day, I wore only clothing I had made for an entire year. Every day my youngest son would take my photo in the same place—the dirt road we live on. I would then post that image on Instagram. Right now, I am very intrigued by paper collage. I started with cough drop wrappers. Every day, I add a new material (usually paper) into that day’s composition. As I run out of a particular material it disappears from the compositions. I have been posting a new piece every day on Instagram. I am not particularly good with mixed media, but I am loving the journey.SAQA: What inspires you?

SHELL: I am constantly inspired by pattern, repetition, color, and the traditional quilt block

SAQA: Have any artists or art movements influenced your work?

SHELL: I think of my work as hard edge painting made with stitch and fabric. The Hard-edge painting style is related to Geometric Abstraction, Op Art, Post-painterly Abstraction, and Color Field painting. Some of my favorite artists are Frank Stella, Josef Albers, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnes Martin, and Bridget Riley.

SAQA: What techniques and materials do you use?

SHELL: I am about as old school as you can get. I always say we piecers do three things—we cut, we stitch, and we press. I use a ruler, and I don’t use ruler. I use vintage and contemporary cotton textiles and hand dyed fabrics. I stitch on a Bernina 640, and I quilt on a Gammill Classic Plus.

SAQA: Where do you create?

SHELL: I have two studios. The main studio is in our home in Anchorage. My husband has built fabric and quilt storage all around the room—it is a highly functional space. I have two sewing centers—one is an old desk where my Bernina lives, the other is a long arm quilting machine. On the front of the studio is an L-shaped cutting station with a view of our front yard.

My second studio is very primitive. It is the back half of an old garage which is attached to our dry cabin in McCarthy, Alaska. There are holes in the walls where the summer breezes comes through, and it is totally powered by the sun. It also has a huge design wall.

SAQA: How do you reconcile the art-making and business sides of your creative life?

To Agnes Martin, with Color © Maria Shell

SHELL: I spend at least half of my time: teaching; writing blogs, lectures, and grants; using social media, and connecting with people via phone and email. I like to get that work done first and then I can go into the studio. If I start with the studio, I have a very hard time quitting and moving into office, but I never have a problem quitting the office work and moving into the studio!SAQA: Have you published in art-related media?

SHELL: C&T is publishing my first book this year. It is called Improv Patchwork: Dynamic Quilts Made with Line & Shape. You can preorder the book here.

I did a short interview for the Quilt Show at the 2016 International Quilt Festival and I am taping a longer episode in August of this year.

I am also part of the SAQA video Stitching Together a Global Community.

SAQA: What are you working on now? What’s next?

SHELL: I just received a fellowship from the Rasmuson Foundation to create 12 new large pieces based on the curved quilt block called Flowering Snowball. I have done a lot of linear work over the last five years, and I am very much looking forward to this new challenge.

I have joined a new small art group called Cloth in Common, and I will be producing new work based on challenges suggested by the members.

Project Every Day—the project where I wore only clothing I have made for an entire year—is moving into the next phase. I am hoping to make a stop action flip book style movie and a series of 12 quilts composed of the remains from the clothing.

I will also be having a solo show at Hello Stitch in Berkeley, California in November & December of 2017.

View more of Maria Shell’s work on her website and SAQA Juried Artist Member profile.

Connect with Maria Shell on Instagram and Facebook, and subscribe to her Blog.

Underwater Fantasy Art Quilt- a work in progress

My underwater fantasy art quilts are created on a table rather than on a design wall. I call it the fabric layering technique. I create a scene and then cover it with tulle netting and free motion quilt the three layers(back, batting,top) together.
I begin by choosing the top fabric. I prefer to choose a fabric with some dimension already on it, light and dark spaces. If I choose a dark background, then I will choose lighter colored materials for my  plants, fish, rocks and other items . If I choose a lighter background, then I will choose darker colored scenery.

Step 1 -The back fabric is flat on the table. A piece of batting is laid on top of that. You can see the white batting  hanging a bit over the edge. Then I laid a piece of moddled commercial fabric on top. The piece is about 14″ by 14″. I let the fabric’s different shades of coloring do part of the work in creating interest and depth in the piece. I lightly baste the layers together with an Avery glue stick.

1

Step 2-For this piece, I cut out light colored rocks and placed them in the foreground. I cut out irregularly shaped dots of different colored batik fabric for the jellies(formerly called jelly fish). I place the jellies as if they are swimming in the current.

2

Step 3- Next, I cut out plants and place them between the rocks. I add decorative threads for the tenacles of the jellies being aware of the movement of the water. When everything is in its place,I  baste the pieces in place with a light dab of glue.

3

 

Step 4-I cover the scene with tulle netting and pin the tulle in place.

4

Step 5- I free motion quilt the three layers together. I lower the feed dogs on my machine to allow me to move the piece however I want. The quilting  creates another level of movement.

5

Step 6-I finish the piece by zigzagging the edges twice. For larger pieces, I often attach a facing and turn it to the back and stitch by hand.

6

Here is a photo of the back of the piece where you can see the machine stitching easier.

back

Studio Art Quilt Associates Featured Artist: Cindy Grisdela

Sharing an interview with a great art quilter,

SAQA Featured Artist: Cindy Grisdela

Cindy Grisdela – Reston, Virginia  http://www.saqa.com/weblog/p=2542&

Artist Statement

From my studio looking out over a lake in Reston, VA, I draw inspiration for my contemporary wall quilts from the view of nature outside my window every day. Pebbles on the path or currents in water might become part of the texture I stitch into each piece. Color combinations in bird feathers or flowering plants might slip into the palette I use to start my next design.

My abstract art quilts are designed improvisationally without a preconceived pattern, a little bit like jazz music. Each decision about color and shape influences the next and complex blocks repeat like beats of a melody, calmed by irregular plain areas that provide a resting place for the eye.

The color is the first step. Putting colors together intuitively, I use fabric the way a painter might use paint to create graphic compositions that engage the viewer from a distance, yet invite a closer look.

The texture is the second step. The stitching lines provide contrast and dimension to the piece, integrating the different elements into a cohesive whole. I do all of my stitching on a sewing machine, but it is entirely hand driven. There’s no computer program or marking ahead of time. I stitch the motifs freehand using the needle and thread of the machine like a pencil or a brush.

I come from a long line of women who have expressed themselves using a needle and thread, although curiously there were no quilters in my family. Creating with various forms of fabric and thread has been a part of my life since I was a child, and I’m self taught as a fiber artist, with lots of experimentation along the way. My formal education includes a BA in Fine Arts from the College of William and Mary and an MBA from George Washington University.

My work is represented by Chasen Galleries in Richmond, VA, and can be found in a number of private collections all over the country. I am a teacher and author.

Interview

(Click images to enlarge)

SAQA: When did you begin making art with fabric? Do you work in other media as well?

Uneven Bars © Cindy Grisdela

GRISDELA: I’ve been sewing since I was 10 and my mother decided I was old enough to be trusted with her beloved Singer. I studied art in high school and college and experimented with painting, drawing, ceramics, sculpture and weaving.I made my first quilt in 1983 after seeing an article in a magazine–a queen size Trip Around the World. After that I was hooked and I spent a number of years making traditional quilts as a creative outlet while I raised my family. About 15 years ago I got bored with following patterns and started seriously trying to make my own art in fabric.

SAQA: What inspires you?

GRISDELA: I’m inspired by abstraction, color and texture. I enjoy playing with color and seeing how various colors and shapes interact. I think one of the reasons I create with fabric instead of with paint, for example, is the ability to add another dimension to my compositions by adding the stitching texture with dense free motion quilting. I want the stitching to be an integral part of the composition, not just a means to hold the three layers together.

SAQA: Have any artists or art movements influenced your work?

GRISDELA: I have a degree in Art History, so there are always lots of influences rattling around in my head. I love Abstract Expressionism, especially the Color Field School of artists. Matisse’s cut outs are important to me, as are Klee, Kandinsky and Klimt. I’m also drawn to the work of Robert and Sonia Delaunay. Among quilt artists, I am indebted to the work of Gwen Marston, who was an early influence.

SAQA: What techniques and materials do you use?

Nautilus © Cindy Grisdela

GRISDELA: I use hand dyed fabrics to create almost all of my current work–mostly by Cherrywood Fabrics. I experimented with dyeing my own fabrics a number of years ago, but realized that’s not my skill, so I’m happy supporting others who do it well.All of my work now is created using improvisational piecing techniques and free motion quilting. I enjoy the dialogue that happens when I’m just cutting out colors and shapes intuitively and letting one decision lead to the next. It’s a little like putting together a jigsaw puzzle, only I get to decide what the picture is going to look like. I do all my quilting freehand, without marking ahead of time or using a computer program.

SAQA: Where do you create?

GRISDELA: I have a studio in the basement of our townhouse on a lake. I look out on the lake while I’m sewing and it’s a very peaceful retreat. The commute downstairs is great too! I also have a shared space with nine other artists a short distance from my home. I’m the only fiber artist in the group, but it’s good to be around other creative people and share inspiration. I try to spend one day a week there.

SAQA: How do you reconcile the art-making and business sides of your creative life?

GRISDELA: That’s the tough part. For the last ten years I’ve been traveling extensively showing an selling my work at fine art and fine craft shows all over the country. I do about 12-14 shows a year. I also have an active blog and presence on Instagram and Facebook, and I’m a regular contributor to the SAQA Journal.

Probably I spend about half my time on the business side–writing, applying to shows, keeping my website up to date, marketing, and other business. I like to spend time in the studio in the morning and early afternoon, because that’s when I’m most creative, and work on other business later in the day. I have to keep lists and work backward to make sure enough time is allotted to keep my inventory up for the shows, so sometimes I’m writing blog posts or marketing pieces on the road.

Lime Medley © Cindy Grisdela

SAQA: Have you published books or been a guest on an art-related media program?GRISDELA: My new book, Artful Improv: Explore Color Recipes, Building Blocks & Free Motion Quilting, was just released by C&T Publishing in October 2016. It’s a friendly guide to creating your own original art quilts without a pattern, using simple design principles and improv techniques.

SAQA: What are you working on now? What’s next?

GRISDELA: I will continue doing shows, although probably not as many in 2017, since I’m doing a lot more teaching in conjunction with the book. It’s such fun to see a diverse group of artists come together for a day or more to explore their individual creativity. Each person’s work is different from the others and different from mine because we all bring our own personalities and history to the table.

I also have plans to work on a new series of larger improv quilts. The great thing about improv is there’s always something new to explore!

View more of Cindy Grisdela’s work on her website and SAQA Juried Artist Member profile

Connect with Cindy Grisdela on Facebook and Instagram

Follow Cindy Grisdela on Twitter and Pinterest

 

Maria Shell, Alaskan Quilter

Faculty Profiles: Maria Shell
 
For more than 35 years, QBL has brought world-class faculty to Central NY for 2 weeks each summer. This year, we’ve invited Maria Shell to teach two signature workshops  Abstraction through Color, Pattern, and Repetition (2-days) and Making Prints out of Solids (3-days). Maria Shell’s work is grounded in the tradition and craft of American quilt making. She strives to take the classical components of a traditional bedquilt and manipulate them with the hope of creating surprising combinations of pattern, repetition, and color for the viewer.
 

An interview with Maria
All of your quilts have such bold graphic colors- have you always worked this way? If not, how have your quilts changed?
This is my very first quilt. (right)
So, I would say that from the beginning I have loved bold graphic colors and compositions. I remember studying for hours and hours quilts that I liked. I wanted to figure out what I liked about them and how I could duplicate that. It really is about creating contrast through pattern, color, or value.
You also have worked on many community quilt projects. Can you tell us some more about that and the people you worked with?
 
I started making community quilts as a way to justify my quilt making obsession. I tried to make a community quilt for every baby that I knew in Valdez, Alaska. I would collect the blocks from other moms and then stitch them together. Lots of quilters helped me make those quilts happen. I have written about these quilts in several blog posts listed below.
In the fall of 2014, I was an Artist in Residence at the McColl Center for Art & Innovation in Charlotte, North Carolina. A big part of that residency program is community engagement. I worked with a formerly chronically homeless population to build a community quilt to be installed at Moore Place, their new home. That was an amazing experience and a spectacular quilt. If you would like to know more about my residency, Moore Place, and HOME the community quilt we built, you can by following these links.
I love the deep meaning of community quilts-we are literally stitched together.
The underlying structure of many of your quilts is actually a simple grid, can you tell us more about how you get so much complexity and variety out of grids?
 
For six years, I have been working in series called Color Grids. They are based on a traditional quilt block that goes by several names including The Red Cross Quilt, Stone Mason’s Puzzle, City Streets, Crossed Square, and my favorite, Squares and Square. It is essentially an uneven nine patch. One of my missions as an artist is to claim the traditional quilt block as a legitimate art form.
I have challenged myself to use this same grid over and over again-just like a gridded traditional quilt. But instead of things remaining static, I expand and contract the grid while also filling the space with different information-color, print, shape, and line are always changing within the constraints of the grid.
Funky Monkey has a slightly different format. If you look closely you will see that Funky Monkey is really sixteen blocks placed in a grid with sashing. The direction of the lines within the blocks creates interesting figure ground work. The eye moves back and forth trying to decide exactly what is ground and what is figure.
With Solstice, I introduced print into the mix. I am still exploring how to successfully do this.  Adding print to the mixture definitely opens up some new possibilities, but it also complicates things because it is one more variable to contend with.
What do you like most about teaching Abstraction through Color, Pattern, and Repetition?
  I love this class because it really is the sum of what I have been working on since I began making quilts. The students start with an image of their own and, with my help, figure out how to abstract it. The compositions that have come out of this workshop are amazing! Here is Wendy Hoag’s quilt that she started in this workshop.
What do students take away from this workshop?
 
 Students get the opportunity learn about how I use color, pattern, and repetition to create abstract work, and they discover that creating original work is exciting and do-able.
What do you like most about teaching Making Prints out of Solids?
 
Making Prints out of Solids is a simple concept with mind boggling opportunities. We all recognize prints in our every day lives-stripes, polka dots, herringbones, chevrons, and even plaids. In this class, we recreate and piece our own prints. It is super exciting. This is sample of what the students learn how to make in this class.
What do students take away from this workshop?
 
Students will learn a lot about color and how pattern and repetition can be used to create dynamic compositions. They will also get a clear handle on how to cut and piece improvisation-ally  while also learning some slick technical tricks to help all those pieces fit together in the end. Kate Yates made these two quilts after taking this workshop. I think they are incredible!
 

More Classes & Information on QBL 2017

QBL Classes  Housing Participant Information
How to Register QBL Quilt Show QBL 2017 Brochure
 
Questions? Call the Schweinfurth Art Center at (315)255-1553 or email qbl@schweinfurthartcenter.org today!
 

New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.
Schweinfurth Art Center · 205 Genesee St. · Auburn, NY 13021 · 315.255.1553 · www.myartcenter.org
Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center, 205 Genesee St., Auburn, NY 13021
Sent by drobedee@schweinfurthartcenter.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact

Alice Beasley, fiber artist

Upcoming exhibitions for Alice Beasley.
Come See the Gator in Chief
Exhibit: June 3 – June 28,2017
 
5327 Jacuzzi St., Suite 3-C
Richmond, CA 94804
Opening Reception: June 4 from 1 to 4 p.m.
 
In this solo exhibition, I’ll be exhibiting several works never seen in the Bay Area before including “Feeding Time at the Swamp” and my “Undercurrents” series of underwater ballets.
Last Chance
The Neuw Politic: Artists Explore closes at the Petaluma Arts Center
on May 20.  Artists from throughout northern California give their take on the current political scene.  My quilt “No Vote No Voice” was named first prize winner.
“No Vote, No Voice,” quilt, 60″ x 36″

Now through May 20
Petaluma Arts Center

230 Lakeville St.
Petaluma, CA
Dynamic Diversity: Quilts by African American Artists
This show opens at the Texas Quilt Museum from June 29 through October 1.  My piece, “A Kiss Goodbye” will be among those exhibited.  Other artists include Marion Coleman, Carolyn Crump, Michael Cummings, Michele David, Valerie Goodwin, Carolyn Mazloomi, Dindga McCannon, Valarie Poitier, Frances Porter and Sidnee Snell.
“A Kiss Goodbye”, 59″ x 44″
 
 
June 29 through October 1
140 West Colorado
La Grange, TX 78945
National African American Quilt Conference
Lawrence, Kansas will be the host city for the first National African American Quilt Conference. In conjunction with the convention, the Lawrence Arts Center will be presenting a group exhibition of six quilters.  I am delighted to be showing “I Always Try to Keep an Open Mind” along with several works at this exhibit.
 
“I Always  Try to Keep an Open Mind”, quilt 56″ x 48″
 
July 12 through August 19
940 New Hampshire St.
Lawrence, KS 66044
Reception: July 28, 5 to 9 p.m.
 
More Shows Coming
I have additional exhibits coming up this summer and fall including “Blood Line” which will have its first local exhibition this fall at the Harrington Gallery, Pleasanton, CA.  So stay tuned.
Visit my website:
Fybrart, 1018 Park Lane, Oakland, CA 94610
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